Let it snow…

There is a Winter Weather Advisory out for the Minneapolis-St Paul metro area this afternoon and evening, and we are supposed to get around 4+ inches of snow, although how much we will actually get is anybody’s guess, as the forecasters haven’t gotten it right once yet this winter. This has proved another wimpy winter by Minnesota standards, especially for those of us who were children in the 1970s and ’80s. Still, although I’m sure there are snowboarders and skiers who are excited for snow, and I must admit that snow is prettier than our current brown and drab color scheme, I am ready for spring. Sunshine, blue skies, and flowers, please: tulips, hyacinths, lilacs and peonies…If you know how I feel, here are some tulip pics to keep you going until the real thing starts growing outside.

“The deep roots never doubt that spring will come.” Marty Rubin

at this table

Happy Sunday! I want to share with you all an exquisite photo essay by my friend Susan Licht.
Some of my most cherished memories are of sitting at my grandmother’s table, listening to the grown-ups talk…I absorbed a lot of wisdom and love on those Sundays sitting at grandma’s table.

Licht Years

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Perhaps the World Ends Here
~ Joy Harjo

The world begins at a kitchen table. No matter what, we must eat to live.
The gifts of earth are brought and prepared, set on the table. So it has been since creation, and it will go on.
We chase chickens or dogs away from it. Babies teethe at the corners. They scrape their knees under it.
It is here that children are given instructions on what it means to be human. We make men at it, we make women.
At this table we gossip, recall enemies and the ghosts of lovers.
Our dreams drink coffee with us as they put their arms around our children. They laugh with us at our poor falling-down selves and as we put ourselves back together once again at the table.
This table has been a house in the rain, an umbrella in the sun.
Wars…

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Have a hygge February

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Relaxing with a good book (or two or three) is quite hygeelig!

This winter the word hygge seems to be everywhere, and from what I’m reading it sounds like a marvelous idea. Although we Americans often translate it loosely as “cozy”, that doesn’t capture the full meaning of the word. In The Cozy Life: Rediscover the Joy of the Simple Things Through  the Danish Concept of Hygge, author Pia Edberg gives her definition of hygge :

hygge (n/vb.): /HOO-gah/

the Danish concept of coziness…

…the art of creating warmth, comfort, and wellbeing through connection, treasuring the moment, and surrounding yourself with the things you love.

Flaky, sweet, pastries are hygge, especially warm from the oven, as is brisk exercise such a snowshoeing or skiing; the hygge feeling is enhanced, according to my books, if such activities are shared with friends and/or family. All of the authors I’ve been reading stress the importance of social connection and togetherness, and stress that these strong relationships and making time with each other a priority are what help them survive their long, dark, frozen winters (kind of like our Minnesota winters, yes). Pia notes that hygge is a lifestyle that feels like being “wrapped up…in a big hug.” You’ll know you’re experiencing hygge when you sense that you are really home: safe, content, happy, and grounded in the present moment.

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Hygge is a warm puppy to snuggle with….
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waking up in the morning with hot tea, fuzzy warm socks, and cosy throws…
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a vigorous hike along the lakeshore in the brisk winter air (yeah, right, sounds great in theory…)